Thursday, March 05, 2009

BRIEF SOA
For this service-oriented world to become a reality, however, companies must move to a new architectural approach known as Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA). SOA is architecture that represents software functionality as discoverable services on the network. A pure architectural definition of an SOA might be "an application architecture within which all functions are defined as independent services with well-defined invokable interfaces, which can be called in defined sequences to form business processes". Only a technical person can understand this definition. I've included a simplified version of this definition in the summary at the end of this article.
Service-oriented architectures are nothing new; the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and the Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) have long provided similar functionality. These existing approaches to service orientation, however, suffered from a few difficult problems like tightly coupled scenarios.
The combination of Web Services and SOAs resolves the issues of CORBA and DCOM approaches to SOAs. Now Web services have removed another barrier by allowing applications to interconnect in an object-model-neutral way. For example, using a simple XML-based messaging scheme, Java applications can invoke Microsoft .NET applications or CORBA-compliant, or even COBOL, applications. So, IBM CICS or IBM IMS transactions on a mainframe in Singapore can be invoked by a .NET application which in turn may be invoked by an agent running on an IBM Lotus Domino server in Munich. Best of all, the invoking application doesn't have to know where the transaction will run, what language it is written in or what route the message may take along the way. A service is requested, and an answer is provided. Web services is a set of enabling technologies for SOA, and SOA is becoming the architecture of choice for development of responsive, adaptive new applications.
The success of many Web services projects have shown that technology does exist that can enable you to implement a true SOA. SOA can be both an architecture and a programming model, a way of thinking about building software. An SOA enables you to design software systems that provide services to other applications through published and discoverable interfaces, and where the services can be invoked over a network. When you implement an SOA using Web services technologies, you create a new way of building applications within a more powerful, flexible programming model. You can reduce your development and ownership costs-and your implementation risk.
It's important to understand that Web services does not equal SOA. Web services is a collection of technologies, including XML, Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Web Services Description Language (WSDL) and Universal Description, Discover and Integration (UDDI), which allow you to build programming solutions for specific messaging and application integration problems. Over time, these technologies can be expected to mature, and eventually be replaced with better, more-efficient, more-robust technology. But for the moment, the existing technologies are sufficient, and have already proven that you can implement an SOA today. SOA is the next wave of application development. Web services and SOA are about designing and building systems using heterogeneous network-addressable software components.
Architecturally, the modern enterprise architecture design could involve:
Service Oriented Event-Driven Loosely coupled Aligned with life cycle support processes Able to support assembly and integration Able to leverage existing applications and infrastructure
SOAs offer the following advantages over traditional approaches to distributed computing:
They offer business services across the platforms They provide location independence Services need not be at a particular system or particular network Completely loosely coupled approach Authentication and authorization support at every level The search and connectivity to other services is dynamic
Short-term benefits of implementation:
Enhances reliability Reduces hardware acquisition costs Leverages existing development skills Accelerates movement to standards-based server and application consolidation Provides a data bridge between incompatible technologies
Long-term benefits of implementation:
Provides the ability to build composite applications Creates a self-healing infrastructure that reduces management costs Provides truly real-time decision-making applications Enables the compilation of a unified taxonomy of information across an enterprise and its customer and partners
Benefits from the perspective of Business Value:
Ability to more quickly meet customer demands Lower costs associated with the acquisition and maintenance of technology Management of business functionality closer to the business units Leverages existing investments in technology Reduces reliance on expensive custom development.


Courtesy: http://www.devshed.com

Monday, February 04, 2008

NOKIA Product list and its series Info

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nokia_products

Friday, December 28, 2007

HP iPAQ 514 Voice Messenger - Good Smart Phone from HP

The next smart phone from HP. It has all the features needed for business persons in its simple form factor. Hewlett Packard that the iPAQ 514 Voice Messenger is a smartphone primarily for business users, and not a phone aimed at those who like to have the very latest features at their fingertips. Yes it runs Windows Mobile 6, which makes it something of a rarity at the moment and in this respect it is ‘state of the art’. But there are features which some consumers will turn their nose up at.

The main cons are the size of the screen and poor camera. As a business user, the later one is not needed. But the size of the screen ?

Its good on cost, form factor, features and value perspectives.

Saturday, December 08, 2007

CHEENI KUM

My first log which differs from the below ones. About a film 'Chennai Kum'. A neat one among some i had observed. Its hard to believe this happening.May happen. The character of 'Sweety', Amithabh and Thabhu, really neat and terriffic.

Its hard to play a character like this, but Thabhu does that (Like a previous one of her "MAQBOOL"). A neat movie which ends hard after some zig-zag screen-palys.

A Fine and Neat one............. ;)

Tuesday, November 06, 2007

An Interesting Thread on HACKERS

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/hacker.htm

Monday, November 05, 2007

Push E-Mail

Push E-Mail utilizes a mail delivery system with real-time capability to “push” email through to the client as soon as it arrives, rather than requiring the client to poll and collect or pull mail manually. With a push email smartphone, for example, the client’s mailbox is constantly updated with arriving email without user intervention. Smartphones announce new mail arrival with an alert.

Push email differs from conventional email systems that are “pull” oriented. Usually, when email is sent, it arrives at the recipient’s ISP's mail server, where it is held for collection. It might instead arrive at a website server, if the email is Web-based. Either way, email remains on the mail server until the recipient uses an email program to poll the mail server. If new mail is present, the email client “pulls” the mail to the client’s computer. The difference between this scheme and push email is that, with push email, the mail is pushed through to the client without waiting for polling.

Push email can be somewhat simulated using an email client set to frequently poll for new mail. However, this requires the email client to be open and running and is less efficient. Polling involves “handshaking” between the client software and the mail server. If the server is busy, the delay in completing the handshake can lengthen, causing the client to time out.

Therefore, polling should not be set so frequently as to cause premature time out errors. To prevent this, one must increase the delay between polling times. In many cases, a minute or two delay between “pull email” and push email schemes may not matter, but in some cases, a minute can make all the difference. Push email can be especially crucial to field reporters, stock market businessmen and other professionals for whom time is of the essence. A one-minute delay can make all the difference in breaking a story, losing money, or making a crucial sale.

BlackBerry was the first PDA to offer push email and gained near-instant success as a result. Today, many devices have incorporated push email, and its popularity continues to grow. Some of the products that have incorporated push email include Chatteremail for Treo, Nokia Intellisync Wireless Email, Roadsync and Sony Ericsson phones.

Sunday, November 04, 2007

High-Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA)

HSDPA, short for High-Speed Downlink Packet Access, is a new protocol for mobile telephone data transmission. Essentially, the standard will provide download speeds on a mobile phone equivalent to an ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) line in a home, removing any limitations placed on the use of your phone by a slow connection. It is an evolution and improvement on W-CDMA, or Wideband Code Division Multiple Access, a 3G protocol. HSDPA improves the data transfer rate by a factor of at least five over W-CDMA. HSDPA can achieve theoretical data transmission speeds of 8-10 Mbps (megabits per second). Though any data can be transmitted, applications with high data demands such as video and streaming music are the focus of HSDPA.

HSDPA improves on W-CDMA by using different techniques for modulation and coding. It creates a new channel within W-CDMA called HS-DSCH, or high-speed downlink shared channel. That channel performs differently than other channels and allows for faster downlink speeds. It is important to note that the channel is only used for downlink. That means that data is sent from the source to the phone. It isn't possible to send data from the phone to a source using HSDPA. The channel is shared between all users which lets the radio signals to be used most effectively for the fastest downloads.

The widespread availability of HSDPA may take a while to be realized, or it may never be achieved. Most countries did not have a widespread 3G network in place as of the end of 2005. Many mobile telecommunications providers are working quickly to deploy 3G networks which can be upgraded to 3.5G when the market demand exists. Other providers tested HSDPA through 2005 and are rolling out the service in mid to late 2006. Early deployments of the service will be at speeds much lower than the theoretically possible rates. Early service will be at 1.8 Mbps, with upgrades to 3.6Mbps as devices are made available that can handle that increased speed.

The long-term acceptance and success of HSDPA is unclear, because it is not the only alternative for high speed data transmission. Standards like CDMA2000 1xEV-DO and WiMax are other potential high speed standards. Since HSDPA is an extension of W-CDMA, it is unlikely to succeed in locations where W-CDMA has not been deployed. Therefore, the eventual success of HSDPA as a 3.5G standard will first depend upon the success of W-CDMA as a 3G standard.HSDPA, short for High-Speed Downlink Packet Access, is a new protocol for mobile telephone data transmission. It is known as a 3.5G (G stands for generation) technology. Essentially, the standard will provide download speeds on a mobile phone equivalent to an ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) line in a home, removing any limitations placed on the use of your phone by a slow connection. It is an evolution and improvement on W-CDMA, or Wideband Code Division Multiple Access, a 3G protocol. HSDPA improves the data transfer rate by a factor of at least five over W-CDMA. HSDPA can achieve theoretical data transmission speeds of 8-10 Mbps (megabits per second). Though any data can be transmitted, applications with high data demands such as video and streaming music are the focus of HSDPA.
Source: http://wisegeek.com